Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Barack Obama, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Food and Culinary Arts, For the Love of FACS, Franklin D. Roosevelt, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, Historical FACS, Home economics, Jimmy Carter, Lyndon Johnson, Presidential palates

Presidential Palates Culinary Quiz

This blog post was originally published on November 7, 2016 as the first in a fifteen-part series related to the 2016 Presidential election. Beginning today we will be sharing these posts again in hopes that our readers will find some historical info regarding past presidents and their food preferences for use in the FACS classroom. A new Presidential Palates post will be shared each weekday between now and Election Day on November 3. Please note that the concluding post of this series is a quiz based on the Presidential Palates series of posts.

This is the official conclusion to our Presidential Palates blog series highlighting the food preferences of twenty-four American Presidents.  I thought it might be fun to provide a simple matching quiz to use with your students to measure what food facts they have retained from these posts.  Just a reminder that the entire Presidential Palates series will be available as a free download on our website www.freshfacs.com later this week.

Presidential Palates

Culinary Quiz

Directions:  Match the American Presidents on the left with their favorite foods.

             Part I (1789 – 1933)

  1.               George Washington                         A.  Gingerbread cookies
  2.              John Adams                                        B.  Roast turkey
  3.              Thomas Jefferson                             C.  Milk fresh from the cow
  4.              Andrew Jackson                                D.  Fried chicken with milk gravy
  5.              Zachary Taylor                                  E.  Apple cider
  6.              Abraham Lincoln                             F.  All types of cheese
  7.              Andrew Johnson                              G.  Creole cooking
  8.              Ulysses S. Grant                               H.  All types of nuts
  9.               James Garfield                                   I.  Macaroni and cheese
  10.              Theodore Roosevelt                         J.  Popcorn
  11.               William H. Taft                                 K.  Squirrel soup

    Part II (1933 – 2017)

  12.               Franklin D. Roosevelt                    A.  Cheeseburger Pizza
  13.               Harry S. Truman                              B.  Texas barbeque
  14.               Dwight D. Eisenhower                   C.  Grilled Cheese Sandwiches
  15.               John F. Kennedy                               D.  Pork Rinds and Tabasco Sauce
  16.               Lyndon B. Johnson                          E.  Chili
  17.               Richard M. Nixon                             F.  Chicken Enchiladas
  18.               Gerald Ford                                        G.  Beef Stew
  19.               Jimmy Carter                                     H.  Jelly Beans
  20.               Ronald Reagan                                   I.  Rare beef steaks
  21.               George H.W. Bush                            J.  New England Clam Chowder
  22.               Bill Clinton                                         K.  English muffins
  23.               George W. Bush                                L. Cheese Grits
  24.               Barack Obama                                   M. Cottage cheese with ketchup

Answers:  1. H, 2. E, 3. I, 4. F, 5. G, 6. A, 7. J, 8. B, 9. K, 10. D, 11. C, 12. C, 13. I, 14. G, 15. J, 16. B, 17. M, 18. K, 19. L, 20. H, 21. D, 22. F, 23. A, 24. E

vote

Don’t forget to vote tomorrow!

historical-facs-red-cover

For more ideas for bringing history and social studies into your FACS curriculum, check out our resource Historical FACS on our website at www.freshfacs.com.

 

 

FACSessorize, Family and Consumer Science Education, Family and Consumer Sciences Day, FCS, Food and Culinary Arts Playlist, For the Love of FACS, Historical FACS, Home economics, Nutrition and Wellness Playlist, Presidential palates

Presidential Palates, Part 4

This blog post was originally published on October 17, 2016 as the first in a fifteen-part series related to the 2016 Presidential election. Beginning today we will be sharing these posts again in hopes that our readers will find some historical info regarding past presidents and their food preferences for use in the FACS classroom. A new Presidential Palates post will be shared each weekday between now and Election Day on November 3. Please note that the concluding post of this series is a quiz based on the Presidential Palates series of posts.

washington

“A glass of wine and a bit of mutton are always welcome.”  George Washington

Our first president, George Washington (1789-1797), was a man of simple taste.  His love of nuts is said to have left him with only one natural tooth.  His habit of cracking nuts with his teeth resulted in a mouthful of false teeth made from a variety of materials–animal teeth, ivory and even wood, according to the Smithsonian Institute.

One of George Washington’s favorite regular menus started with cream of peanut soup and ended with Martha’s whiskey cake.  (President Washington was very fond of his mash.  He started a whiskey-distillation business at Mount Vernon after leaving politics.)

mt
The Dining Room at Mt. Vernon, George Washington’s home.

Cream of Peanut Soup

2 tablespoons butter

1 stalk celery, chopped

1/2 medium onion, chopped

1  1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

4 cups chicken or vegetable broth

1 cup creamy peanut butter

1 cup milk

Snipped chives

Chopped peanuts for garnish

Directions:

  1. Melt butter in medium saucepan.  Cook celery and onion until onion is tender, but not browned.  Stir in flour and cook about one minute.  Whisk in chicken broth, cooking until thickened and bubbly.
  2. Remove from heat.  Puree mixture in batches, in a blender, until smooth.  Return to saucepan.
  3. Add the peanut butter and milk, stirring to blend thoroughly.  Heath through, but do not boil.  Serve hot or cold.  Garnish with snipped chives and chopped peanuts, if desired.

cream-of-peanut-soupThis is a simplified version of the recipe that would have been served to Washington and his guests, but it has the same rich flavor and creamy consistency of the original.  It is also much more classroom-friendly.  Give it a try with your students!

More Presidential Palates tomorrow!  Happy Monday!