FACSessorize, Family and Consumer Science Education, FCS, Food and Culinary Arts, For the Love of FACS, Historical FACS, Home Ecology, Home economics, Save FACS

First Ever Friday FACSessories

Facsessorize logo

One of the things I love most about the field of Family and Consumer Science is the way our course content touches every aspect of life!  I see random links to FACS in the news, in magazines, on social media; virtually all around us!  I call these fun facts and bits of trivia FACSessories!  Yes, I made up that word, but I think it fits!  If you’ll read the definition in the graphic above, I think you’ll understand where I’m coming from.  Anyway, I thought I’d share a few FACSessories with you on Fridays.  I hope you’ll share some of these factoids with your students.  You never know what will catch their attention and help them to remember what you’ve discussed in class!

FACSessory #1

Today (April 5) is National Caramel Day!  Americans began making sugary syrups in the 1600s, but the delicious, chewy caramel we love today is a more recent invention.  Caramel candy emerged in the 18th century and quickly became one of the most popular sweets on the market.  In fact, Milton Hershey’s first business was the Lancaster Caramel company!

Caramel is made with butter, brown and white sugar, milk or cream, and vanilla.  It’s usually enjoyed as an ice cream topping, a candy filling, or by itself.  Caramel is an important ingredient in the first ever combination candy bar, the Goo Goo Cluster!

Ask students to think of other dishes, products or recipes where caramel is used as an important ingredient.

FACSessory #2

We casually use trademarked product names in our every written and spoken communication.  There’s a word for this practice–genericide.  Genericide is the process of a trademark becoming generally recognized to represent a particular type of product, rather than the specific company’s product that the trademark emanated from.  This practice is very common in food products.  Here are some food terms you probably didn’t know were trademarked.

  • Shredded wheat
  • Broccolini
  • Butterscotch
  • Granola
  • Jell-O
  • Pink Lady Apples
  • Popsicle
  • Saltine
  • TV Dinner
  • Ugli fruit
  • Coca Cola
  • Thermos

Other FACS-related trademark names (and their non-trademarked names) are:

  • Onesies (Body suit)
  • Crock-Pot (Slow cooker)
  • Chopstick
  • Velcro (Hook and loop fastener)
  • Band-Aid
  • Kleenex (facial tissue)
  • Cuisinart (food processor)
  • Frisbee
  • Pampers
  • Play-Doh
  • Tupperware (Plastic storage container)

Discuss with your students the pros and cons of marketing a genericide trademarked product.

Visit our website for more FACSessorize fun!  Happy Friday!

FACessorize cover cut

Follow Fresh FACS on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter for more useful FACS facts and information!

 

Children and Families, FACS Engineering, Family and Consumer Science Education, FCS, Food and Culinary Arts, For the Love of FACS, Historical FACS, Home economics, Housing and Interior Design Playlist, In Stitches, Reading in the FACS Classroom, Save FACS, Techno FACS

This Is New!

I’m sure you’ve all experienced that rush of adrenaline when something you’ve been working on for a very long time finally becomes reality!  It’s heady and exhilarating, right?  Well, that’s where our little staff at Fresh FACS is right now!  For a little over four months, we’ve been working on the development and launch of our 2018 catalog and it’s finally complete and ready to share with all of you and we’re very excited.

Now you’re probably wondering, what’s the big deal, right?  We publish a standard catalog of our products every year, so how is this any different and why should you, our FACS friends, care?  Well, I’m glad you asked!  We decided to take an entirely new approach to our catalog this year.  We wanted to make it more than just a showcase of our products.  We wanted it to be something that FACS teachers would enjoy perusing–more like a magazine than a catalog!  So that’s exactly what we did!  We created an attractive publication in which we hope you will find tons of useful and interesting information!  And, oh yes, you will also have access to information about our entire product line of fresh ideas for the FACS classroom!

The cover image of our magazine/catalog appears at the top of this post.  If you’ll look closely at the text on the chalkboard image, you’ll see five project titles listed:  Pizza Perfection, Pasta Engineering, Sweet Architecture, Idea to Icon and Stories and Stitches.  These are five brand new FACS activities outlined in the magazine/catalog that are free for you download to use in your classroom.  Here’s a summary and description of each activity.

pizza_2

Pizza Perfection–The Science and Style of Pizza

Through this activity, students will explore the science, math, history and style of this incredibly popular dish.  This multi-faceted activity includes:

  • Top Your Own Pizza Recipe
  • Pizza Dictionary
  • A Slice of Pizza History
  • Pizza Personality, What’s Your Style?  An exploration of the most popular styles of pizza and their characteristics.
  • Pizza Style Investigation
  • Pizza With Style, Beyond the Basic Recipe–An exercise in pizza recipe development

pasta salad for blog

Pasta Engineering–Engineering the Perfect Pasta Salad

This activity will introduce students to the science and engineering of developing the perfect pasta salad.  The activity includes:

  • An introduction to pasta shapes in Pasta Salad Varieties–ID, Please!
  • Selecting the pasta for and original pasta salad recipe.
  • Cooking secrets for perfect pasta salad.
  • Steps and options for developing the perfect original pasta salad recipe.
  • Pasta Salad Dressing Options
  • Engineering the Perfect Pasta Salad Planning guide.

malibu gingerbread house

Sweet Architecture–Engineering a Not So Classic Gingerbread House

This activity is designed to provide students with experience in the application of the principles of the science of baking; observation of the fundamentals of engineering a stable structure; and identification and replication of the elements of specific architectural styles.  This is definitely not a quick holiday activity!  The activity includes:

  • An introduction to ten architectural styles.
  • An Architectural Elements Research Guide
  • Gingerbread Backstory, Hansel and Gretel and Beyond.
  • Engineering a Gingerbread House
  • Gingerbread Glossary
  • Recipes for Construction Gingerbread and Edible Icing Mortar
  • Testing the Mortar, Assessing the Structural Integrity of Edible Mortar options.
  • Gingerbread Hints and Hacks

shutterstock_300027362

Stories and Stitches

This activity combines reading, crafts, sewing and identification of developmental stages into one comprehensive and fun activity.  The project includes:

  • Guidelines for Selecting Books for Preschoolers
  • Benefits of reading in early childhood development
  • Sewing Cards as a Developmental Tool
  • Project outline to guide students through the steps in creating a set of original sewing cards based on a book of their own selection.
  • Sewing Cards Design Activity Evaluation Rubric

shutterstock_123094528

Edible Art Exhibit

Hosting an edible art exhibit can be an excellent opportunity to showcase students’ culinary and artistic skills.  Creating an original work of edible art requires the application of concepts related to:

  • Knife skills
  • Garnishing
  • Cake decorating
  • Food safety and sanitation
  • Food preservation
  • Food selection and purchasing
  • Cost management
  • Food photography
  • Structural design
  • Presentation

This activity will guide you and your students through the process of designing edible works or art, as well as planning and coordinating an edible art exhibit.

timeline_1

Idea to Icon

Many of the products we use every day have very interesting back stories.  This timeline project is designed to guide students through researching and creating a timeline for one of a dozen iconic consumer products:  commercial sewing pattern, breakfast cereal, blender, disposable diaper, commercial baby food, recliner, pizza, fast food, car seat, blue jeans, sneakers, or flip flops.  The activity includes:

  • Research guidelines
  • Timeline examples
  • Presentation options
  • Evaluation rubric

There’s so much more to learn and do in the 2018 Fresh FACS magazine/catalog!  We hope you’ll check it out.  You can page through the entire catalog by clicking on the image below.  To request a hard copy of the magazine/catalog, send us a request on this blog or by private message on Facebook.  Be sure to include the address where you would like your publication mailed.

Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Barack Obama, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Food and Culinary Arts, For the Love of FACS, Franklin D. Roosevelt, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, Historical FACS, Home economics, Jimmy Carter, Lyndon Johnson, Presidential palates

Presidential Palates Culinary Quiz

This is the official conclusion to our Presidential Palates blog series highlighting the food preferences of twenty-four American Presidents.  I thought it might be fun to provide a simple matching quiz to use with your students to measure what food facts they have retained from these posts.  Just a reminder that the entire Presidential Palates series will be available as a free download on our website www.freshfacs.com later this week.

Presidential Palates

Culinary Quiz

Directions:  Match the American Presidents on the left with their favorite foods.

             Part I (1789 – 1933)

  1.               George Washington                         A.  Gingerbread cookies
  2.              John Adams                                        B.  Roast turkey
  3.              Thomas Jefferson                             C.  Milk fresh from the cow
  4.              Andrew Jackson                                D.  Fried chicken with milk gravy
  5.              Zachary Taylor                                  E.  Apple cider
  6.              Abraham Lincoln                             F.  All types of cheese
  7.              Andrew Johnson                              G.  Creole cooking
  8.              Ulysses S. Grant                               H.  All types of nuts
  9.               James Garfield                                   I.  Macaroni and cheese
  10.              Theodore Roosevelt                         J.  Popcorn
  11.               William H. Taft                                 K.  Squirrel soup

    Part II (1933 – 2017)

  12.               Franklin D. Roosevelt                    A.  Cheeseburger Pizza
  13.               Harry S. Truman                              B.  Texas barbeque
  14.               Dwight D. Eisenhower                   C.  Grilled Cheese Sandwiches
  15.               John F. Kennedy                               D.  Pork Rinds and Tabasco Sauce
  16.               Lyndon B. Johnson                          E.  Chili
  17.               Richard M. Nixon                             F.  Chicken Enchiladas
  18.               Gerald Ford                                        G.  Beef Stew
  19.               Jimmy Carter                                     H.  Jelly Beans
  20.               Ronald Reagan                                   I.  Rare beef steaks
  21.               George H.W. Bush                            J.  New England Clam Chowder
  22.               Bill Clinton                                         K.  English muffins
  23.               George W. Bush                                L. Cheese Grits
  24.               Barack Obama                                   M. Cottage cheese with ketchup

Answers:  1. H, 2. E, 3. I, 4. F, 5. G, 6. A, 7. J, 8. B, 9. K, 10. D, 11. C, 12. C, 13. I, 14. G, 15. J, 16. B, 17. M, 18. K, 19. L, 20. H, 21. D, 22. F, 23. A, 24. E

vote

Don’t forget to vote tomorrow!

historical-facs-red-cover

For more ideas for bringing history and social studies into your FACS curriculum, check out our resource Historical FACS on our website at www.freshfacs.com.