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Presidential Palates, Part 6

This blog post was originally published on October 19, 2016 as the first in a fifteen-part series related to the 2016 Presidential election. Beginning today we will be sharing these posts again in hopes that our readers will find some historical info regarding past presidents and their food preferences for use in the FACS classroom. A new Presidential Palates post will be shared each weekday between now and Election Day on November 3. Please note that the concluding post of this series is a quiz based on the Presidential Palates series of posts.

franklin-d

Franklin D. Roosevelt (1933 – 1945), was known as a man of the people.  Perhaps guiding the nation through the dark and austere days of the Great Depression, gave him a true appreciation for the simpler things in life.

Roosevelt considered hot dogs a favorite meal.  Much to his mother, Sara Roosevelt’s chagrin, he even served them, along with cold beer, to England’s King George VI and Queen Elizabeth when they visited his Summer White House in June of 1939.  There are many other documented occasions when hot dogs and other simple fare were served to White House visitors and prominent dignitaries during President Roosevelt’s administration.

Henrietta Nesbitt, the White House housekeeper in Roosevelt’s White, FDR was also very fond of a grilled cheese sandwich oozing with lots of cheese.  The recipe below would be a good choice for a foods lab activity, during which you could discuss the accomplishments of the FDR administration that affect their lives every day.

Reasons Students Should Be Grateful to FDR:

  • If you have an account at a community bank, you should be glad that FDR created the FDIC, which ensures the security of individual accounts.
  • If you have a job, you have FDR to thank for the size of your paycheck.  He created the federal minimum wage through the National Industrial Recovery Act.
  • If you did not have to go to work in a factory or other menial job when you were a little kid, you can thank FDR.  His office created the Fair Labor Standards Act, which banned the exploitation of child workers.
  • Finally, if you plan to drink responsibly when you are of legal age, you have FDR to thank.  He is responsible for abolishing prohibition.

Grilled Cheese Sandwich

4 slices bread

3 tablespoons butter, divided

2 slices Cheddar cheese

Directions:

  1. Preheat skillet over medium heat.
  2. Generously butter one side of a slice of bread.
  3. Place bread butter-side-down onto skillet bottom and add 1 slice of cheese.
  4. Butter a second slice of bread on one side and place butter-side-up on top of sandwich.
  5. Grill until lightly and flip over; continue grilling until cheese is melted.
  6. Repeat with remaining 2 slices of bread, butter and cheese slice.

Yield:  2 servings

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This Is New!

I’m sure you’ve all experienced that rush of adrenaline when something you’ve been working on for a very long time finally becomes reality!  It’s heady and exhilarating, right?  Well, that’s where our little staff at Fresh FACS is right now!  For a little over four months, we’ve been working on the development and launch of our 2018 catalog and it’s finally complete and ready to share with all of you and we’re very excited.

Now you’re probably wondering, what’s the big deal, right?  We publish a standard catalog of our products every year, so how is this any different and why should you, our FACS friends, care?  Well, I’m glad you asked!  We decided to take an entirely new approach to our catalog this year.  We wanted to make it more than just a showcase of our products.  We wanted it to be something that FACS teachers would enjoy perusing–more like a magazine than a catalog!  So that’s exactly what we did!  We created an attractive publication in which we hope you will find tons of useful and interesting information!  And, oh yes, you will also have access to information about our entire product line of fresh ideas for the FACS classroom!

The cover image of our magazine/catalog appears at the top of this post.  If you’ll look closely at the text on the chalkboard image, you’ll see five project titles listed:  Pizza Perfection, Pasta Engineering, Sweet Architecture, Idea to Icon and Stories and Stitches.  These are five brand new FACS activities outlined in the magazine/catalog that are free for you download to use in your classroom.  Here’s a summary and description of each activity.

pizza_2

Pizza Perfection–The Science and Style of Pizza

Through this activity, students will explore the science, math, history and style of this incredibly popular dish.  This multi-faceted activity includes:

  • Top Your Own Pizza Recipe
  • Pizza Dictionary
  • A Slice of Pizza History
  • Pizza Personality, What’s Your Style?  An exploration of the most popular styles of pizza and their characteristics.
  • Pizza Style Investigation
  • Pizza With Style, Beyond the Basic Recipe–An exercise in pizza recipe development

pasta salad for blog

Pasta Engineering–Engineering the Perfect Pasta Salad

This activity will introduce students to the science and engineering of developing the perfect pasta salad.  The activity includes:

  • An introduction to pasta shapes in Pasta Salad Varieties–ID, Please!
  • Selecting the pasta for and original pasta salad recipe.
  • Cooking secrets for perfect pasta salad.
  • Steps and options for developing the perfect original pasta salad recipe.
  • Pasta Salad Dressing Options
  • Engineering the Perfect Pasta Salad Planning guide.

malibu gingerbread house

Sweet Architecture–Engineering a Not So Classic Gingerbread House

This activity is designed to provide students with experience in the application of the principles of the science of baking; observation of the fundamentals of engineering a stable structure; and identification and replication of the elements of specific architectural styles.  This is definitely not a quick holiday activity!  The activity includes:

  • An introduction to ten architectural styles.
  • An Architectural Elements Research Guide
  • Gingerbread Backstory, Hansel and Gretel and Beyond.
  • Engineering a Gingerbread House
  • Gingerbread Glossary
  • Recipes for Construction Gingerbread and Edible Icing Mortar
  • Testing the Mortar, Assessing the Structural Integrity of Edible Mortar options.
  • Gingerbread Hints and Hacks

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Stories and Stitches

This activity combines reading, crafts, sewing and identification of developmental stages into one comprehensive and fun activity.  The project includes:

  • Guidelines for Selecting Books for Preschoolers
  • Benefits of reading in early childhood development
  • Sewing Cards as a Developmental Tool
  • Project outline to guide students through the steps in creating a set of original sewing cards based on a book of their own selection.
  • Sewing Cards Design Activity Evaluation Rubric

shutterstock_123094528

Edible Art Exhibit

Hosting an edible art exhibit can be an excellent opportunity to showcase students’ culinary and artistic skills.  Creating an original work of edible art requires the application of concepts related to:

  • Knife skills
  • Garnishing
  • Cake decorating
  • Food safety and sanitation
  • Food preservation
  • Food selection and purchasing
  • Cost management
  • Food photography
  • Structural design
  • Presentation

This activity will guide you and your students through the process of designing edible works or art, as well as planning and coordinating an edible art exhibit.

timeline_1

Idea to Icon

Many of the products we use every day have very interesting back stories.  This timeline project is designed to guide students through researching and creating a timeline for one of a dozen iconic consumer products:  commercial sewing pattern, breakfast cereal, blender, disposable diaper, commercial baby food, recliner, pizza, fast food, car seat, blue jeans, sneakers, or flip flops.  The activity includes:

  • Research guidelines
  • Timeline examples
  • Presentation options
  • Evaluation rubric

There’s so much more to learn and do in the 2018 Fresh FACS magazine/catalog!  We hope you’ll check it out.  You can page through the entire catalog by clicking on the image below.  To request a hard copy of the magazine/catalog, send us a request on this blog or by private message on Facebook.  Be sure to include the address where you would like your publication mailed.

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Easy, Elegant Monday Night Dinner!

IMG_0488 Dining In logo

I hope you have already committed to be a part of the “Dining In” for Healthy Families initiative sponsored by AAFCS in celebration of Family & Consumer Sciences Day, December 3.  If you haven’t already signed up or if you need more information, click the logo above. 

The dinner recipe I prepared last night, Chicken Dijonaisse,  sounds fancy but it’s very quick and easy to make.  Did I mention that it’s also delicious?  I served it with fresh green beans and tomatoes (purchased from the farmer’s market on Saturday) and half of a baked potato!  I shared the other half with my husband BTW!

Chicken Dijonnaise

4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves (about 1 ¼ to 1 ½ lb.)
¼ cup all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons chopped green onion
½ cup fat free Half & Half
3 tablespoons dry white wine or chicken broth
3 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard

Fresh thyme (optional)

Directions:

1.    Place each chicken breast half between two pieces of plastic wrap.  Using the flat side of a meat mallet, lightly pound chicken to ¼ to ⅛-inch thickness.  Discard plastic wrap.

2.    In a shallow dish, combine flour and pepper.  Coat chicken pieces with flour mixture.

3.    In a 12-inch skillet, melt butter over medium heat.  Add chicken to skillet.

4.    Cook about 6 minutes or until no pick remains in the chicken, turning once.  Transfer chicken to a platter, reserving dripping in skillet.  Cover to keep warm.

5.    For sauce, add green onion to the drippings in the skillet.  Cook and stir over medium het for 1 to 2 minutes or until tender.

6.    Stir in Half and Half, white wine, and mustard.

7.    Cook and stir for 1 to 2 minutes of until smooth and slightly thickened.

8.    Spoon sauce over chicken.  If desired, garnish with fresh thyme.

Yield:    4 servings

Nutritional Facts

One serving contains 298 calories, 16 g fat, 110 mg cholesterol, 8 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 28 g protein, 208 mg sodium

Hope you give this recipe a try!  I think it will be a real hit with your family!

Ramona